You know you’ve never been to Iqaluit/Frobisher Bay when…

One of my favourite Facebook pages is called “You know you’re from Iqaluit/Frobisher Bay when….”

There, you can see photos from the 1970s and 1980s and even earlier that you won’t see elsewhere showing how this city, now with close to 8,000 residents, has so radically changed.

But you can only appreciate these photos if you have lived or stayed in Frobisher Bay, now known as Iqaluit.

So, for those of you who haven’t visited Iqaluit or are planning to come, or will never come due to the cost and distance of the trip, or who are simply tired of Arctic ice photos, I plan to post photos to give you glimpses of the city during the coming month — usually the best period of the year for outdoor photography thanks to the sun and snow.

Flying in from Kuujjuaq in Nunavik, in Quebec, about an hour away by jet, you could see easily see the land below; there was not a cloud in the sky on March 27.

And I was fascinated by the view through my window of lines in the snow-covered rocky slopes below me.

This is what I saw as we were approaching Iqaluit. (PHOT BY JANE GEORGE)

This is what I saw as we were approaching Iqaluit. (PHOT BY JANE GEORGE)

Sitting on the right side of the jet, I was able to get a great look at Iqaluit as we approached the airport. Actually, everything appears better from this altitude and at this time of year when the snow makes everything look clean. And if I had been seated on the other side of the aircraft, I would have been looking down at the dump.

Iqaluit looks cute as we prepare for landing in March 27. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)

Iqaluit actually looks cute as we prepare for landing in March 27. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)

After landing, I took a photo of Iqaluit’s “yellow submarine” airport when I walked out of the plane. Just because it looked bright and cheerful, and because, for once, it was warm enough to take my mittens off to take a photo.

I don't think I have ever taken a photo of this airport before. But with my new phone's camera, anything is possible. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)

I don’t think I have ever taken a photo of this airport before. But with my new phone’s camera, anything is possible. (PHOTO BY JANE GEORGE)

In my previous blog post, you read about Arctic domes. Well, you won’t see any of these in my future posts about Iqaluit, because the domes of Iqaluit have all been torn down, but I’ll show you some more of today’s city and its other strange buildings.

Everything is pretty new, so you won’t see anything like the bus-home that I recently saw posted on that Frobisher Bay Facebook page and which is long gone….

Dwelling like this one from a Facebook page on Frobisher Bay, now Iqaluit, are a thing of the past.

Dwelling like this one from a Facebook page on Frobisher Bay, now Iqaluit, are a thing of the past.

Curious about the Canadian Arctic of the 1990s? You will want to read my “Like an iceberg” series. You can find all the links here.

 

 

 

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