My best Arctic trips, Part 5

And so on this journey in 2006 from southeastern Finland to the top of Arctic Norway I ended up at Riddu Riddu, Norway’s annual Indigenous music and culture festival, about which I have written before here.

In 2020, there was no Riddu Riddu, due to the pandemic.

But when I went to Riddu Riddu in 2006, its program showcased everything from “polar ska,” “Ainu dub,” “tribal funk” to “ethno-futuristic rock” played by Indigenous groups from Norway, Russia, Japan, Brazil, Siberia, South Africa, Greenland and Alaska.

And, for me, it wasn’t so much a life-changing experience as a life-affirming one as late into the night I listened to music with new and old friends.

Ayarhaan, which means “the tribe of the creator” or, as Riddu Riddu’s program said, “girl power from Yakutia,” took the festival by surprise.

Ayarhaan’s wildly traditional music combined elements of of traditional throat singing and Jimmy Hendrix. Their home, Yakutia in central Siberia, is a place where temperatures range from -40 C in winter to 30 C in the summer, an extreme sort of place that produced their extreme version of throat singing.

“To survive you have to be strong, so you can hear the strength in the music,” said Albina Degtyareva, the group’s lead singer. “In Yakutia, you can feel and hear the power inside you.”

Her mouth harp, or “khomous,” looked like a pair of scissors with a metal tine sticking through the middle. Yakutians traditionally use the khomous, which was said to have been made by gods and possess a magical voice, to accompany their throat singing.

Ainu musician Oki Kano, below, performed a dub-like mix of the tonkori and double bass. His “Salmon Song” about returning to your roots is still on my playlist.

“I urge all indigenous youth to return to their villages,” Oki said before singing his wild “Salmon Song.”

“Many Japanese are supporting Ainu rights, and although there is more awareness, there is still racism. Racism exists on two levels, one is the everyday kind of racism at school, or say when Ainu want to marry a Japanese and the parents are opposed to it. The other level is on the government level.

“The government is very clever though, and makes the Ainu lifestyle the same as for Japanese, although Ainu have a lower income and standard of education. The government can then say they are supporting the Ainu, without giving us rights, such as fishing or land rights. So we have to do something, and that something is music,” said Kano in an online interview.

And award-winning singer and songwriter Maire Boine, below, who brought Saami yoik to another level, also performed. (BTW her album, one of my favourites, called Gula Gula, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.)

And so it went on.  82-year old Ivvar-Niillas performed yoik… a Maori singer filled the stage…as did Pamyua from Alaska…

And then the show was over and it was time to travel south.

When I got back to Finland, the sun was already setting at night, summer was nearly finished and I went back to Canada.

If you missed the earlier parts of this best Arctic trip, you can read Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4.

And why did I write all this? Maybe to go beyond the restrictions of COVID-19 and to remember who I am?

My next best Arctic trip date may bring us to Greenland or Iceland…

My photo picks of 2018

When I think of 2018, the images that stick in my mind the most were of birds and the sky, in all its amazing shades (but especially pink.) Here are 10 of my photos that still resonate the most with me—so enjoy!

The snow bunting

bunting1

Here’s a chilly little bunting from this past October in Cambridge Bay. I loved watched the buntings at the feeder. This one was taking a break in the sun.

Pink Cambridge Bay

pink_cambay2

Walking around Cambridge Bay in October at sunset suddenly everything turns pink over Mt. Pelly.

Frost flowers

frost_flowers3

This year’s crop of frost flowers in Cambridge Bay: They don’t last long, popping out of the ice only when freeze-up takes place quickly. There are certain places I always check for frost flowers and I wasn’t disappointed this year.

Kamiks

kamiks_4

I really wanted these kamiks for sale in Cambridge Bay but I didn’t have $450 (and I already have a similar, if not so beautiful pair.)

Snowy window

flower_5

This May in Iqaluit I felt like there were just too many snowy days. Here’s how it looked from inside.

Truck on an icy pad

truck6

I had never noticed until this June that as the snow finally melts, under every parked vehicle that didn’t move all winter you see a layer of hard snow long which lasts after the snow everywhere else goes. Makes sense!

Clothes as art

clothees7

This display of traditional clothing in the foyer of the Nunavut legislature looked like fine arts gallery to me.

Awesome dance

dance8

Wow what an evening at the Kitikmeot Inuit Association feast in October where Julia Ogina (right) performed with another dancer (left, but I didn’t get his name.) The dance can’t really be captured in a photo but you can find a video on my Twitter feed at @sikugirl: https://twitter.com/sikugirl/status/1053123054560133120

Pink lake

lake9

This was my view from my lake home over to the island in Quebec in November when I got to see the pink freeze-up phenomenon all over again.

The woodpecker

bird_10

My frequent avian visitor in Quebec: a splashy pileated woodpecker.

Check out the other older posts on A date with siku girl as well!